The Dundrum Town Centre Witch

Posted: November 17, 2013 in Fantasy, Magic
Tags: , , ,
Image courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Aoife Darmody was always glad when school was over. She didn’t mind going to school – it was just boring, the stuff they learned was way too easy for her taste. As she knew that her father wouldn’t come home for another two hours, she walked over to Dundrum Town Centre. Aoife loved strolling through the mall – it was just fun! She stopped to treat herself to a hot chocolate and a cream cheese bagel. While she sprinkled some vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg on her hot chocolate, she heard the woman behind her wonder about the bills in her purse. “What’s going on, now? I had two 10-Euro-bills in my purse – now there is one 20-Euro-bill! Aoife left the coffee shop and turned right.

At INGLOT‘s, a young shop assistant was sorting new lipsticks in the display rack. She had sorted them from light to dark shades to make this task easier. She inserted two lipsticks, took the next two and – halted. The first lipsticks were the of the two lightest shades, the other two were of medium and dark shade. “What the…?!” The shop assistant shook her head and sorted the lipsticks, took the lightest and inserted them in the display, took the next lipsticks and – cursed. Again, the shades were not the expected ones. Aoife chose an eyeliner and paid. A look at her watch told her it was time to go home.

On Thursday, she went over to Dundrum Town Centre for another hot chocolate. The customer behind her wanted to pay with a 50-Euro-bill. The cashier complained loudly that they were out of change because everybody paid with 20 or 50-Euro-bills. She pressed a key to open the till and it opened slowly. It was filled to the brim with 5-Euro-bills and coins. Aoife helped herself to vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg, closed the lid and took a gulp. Yum! She left for the clothes department, she wanted to treat herself to a new sleep-shirt.

There were some nice sleep-shirts available. She chose a knee-length one; the colour was of a deep emerald shade, the price was acceptable. A slightly plump young woman who had searched for a nice scarf was waiting behind her in the queue. She had seemed torn between a baby-blue and a turquoise coloured scarf. Finally, she had taken the baby-blue one and now queued to pay. Aoife paid. While she bagged her purchase, the young woman handed the scarf to the cashier while fishing for her purse. “What an awesome colour!” the cashier exclaimed. “It makes your eyes sparkle!” He smiled at the woman as she handed him the money. Her cheeks slightly reddened and her eyes grew big as she saw that he was holding the turquoise scarf. Aoife smiled and went home.

On Friday, Aoife went to Dundrum Town Centre ‘on official business’ – her father had asked her to pick up his camera from the shop. The billboard in the hall showed the usual Christmas greetings, alternating with shop advertisements. A couple was mutely strolling along the aisle. The woman looked up at the billboard, gasped, and beamed. The billboard read: “Happy anniversary, Margie! Love, Bill” – excitedly, she tugged at Bill’s sleeve. He turned his head, saw her radiating smile, his eyes following her outstretched arm. He read “Happy anniversary, Bill! Love, Margie”, smiled, hugged her. The old fire was back. They continued their way through the mall, holding hands, no longer bored with each other. The billboard announced “Have a delicious latte macchiato at café zest

Aoife entered the shop to get her father’s camera. A neighbour was at the counter, waiting to get back his now repaired grandfather clock. The clock had for years randomly chimed its shrill ding-ding-ding until his wife had urged Mr Brown to have it repaired. Mr Brown and the clerk held their breath as the clock started to show 5 o’clock. For the first time in its existence, the clock emanated the melodious Big Ben jingle. The clerk was dumbstruck, Mr Brown was truly impressed. “This is amazing! I love it!” Mr Brown paid and trudge off with his clock. Still shaking his head, the clerk turned towards Aoife. She handed over the paper slip. He fetched the camera, explaining what he had done with it. Aoife paid the bill, thanked the clerk, and went back home.

On Monday, Aoife left school as usual and went to Dundrum Town Centre. On her way in, she saw the slightly plump woman with the cashier. They were sitting in the café, talking animatedly. Both were smiling and visibly enjoying themselves. Aoife queued for her hot chocolate and a blueberry muffin. The customer behind her complained about the lack of cherry muffins. Aoife peeked into the bag she was handed, grinned – and handed him the bag. “This must have been a mix-up. I ordered a blueberry muffin, and this is a cherry muffin.” She received her blueberry muffin and left the café.

Her next destination was eason‘s as she wanted to buy a special book for her father. A young mother was hurrying through the store with two little kids in tow. “I wanna have a teddy bear,” the girl squealed. “And I wanna have this sword!” the little boy screeched, grabbed the sword, swung it around and hit Aoife’s chocolate. The paper cups contents spattered the carpet. The boy wailed. His mother turned around and saw – nothing. The sword was in the knight’s hand, the paper cup was in Aoife’s calm hand as she relished the last gulps of her hot chocolate, the carpet was spotless. Aoife went to the history section, found the book she intended to give her father as a Christmas present, went to the cashier, paid, and had it gift-wrapped.

“Until next time, Aoife!  :-)” the billboard read.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s